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Yes on Question 6 Means Less Pollution, More Jobs

Monday, Nov 05 2018

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By
Abigail Ross Hopper & Adam Browning
YES on 6

Nevada families will head to the polls tomorrow and cast their ballots in a host of hotly contested races. But whether you’re a Republican, Democrat or Independent, there are two things all voters agree on: They want clean air and they want prosperity.

A vote YES on Question 6 will bring the state both. The measure will ensure that 50 percent of Nevada’s power comes from renewable sources, like solar and wind, by 2030. This will reduce pollution, lower energy bills and create more jobs for those developing solar projects.

Nevada has already seen the benefits of having a clean energy industry. No matter where you live in the state, you’ve likely seen large solar arrays or homes with solar panels delivering non-polluting energy. According to The Solar Foundation’s annual job census, the local solar industry has put more than 6,500 Nevadans to work building a brighter energy future.

Yet, 80 percent of the Silver State’s energy still comes from fossil fuels. While the carbon, sulfur and mercury pollution that‘s produced by burning fossil fuels may not always be visible, it’s in the air we breathe and significantly impacts health, particularly for children, seniors and low-income families.

Nevada’s most populated counties, Clark and Washoe, both received an F grade for air quality from the American Lung Association. The organization also ranked Las Vegas as the 12th most ozone polluted city in America.

The people of Nevada deserve better.

A new analysis by the Natural Resources Defense Council found that if Question 6 is approved, power plant pollution in the state would be reduced by 74 percent. Moving to 50 percent renewable energy by 2030 is neither radical nor expensive. It’s common sense.

In 2009, Nevada set an achievable goal of 25 percent renewable energy by 2025. Since then, solar has become the least expensive source of electricity in Nevada. The price of solar power dropped by 80% in the past decade, and these costs will only continue to fall as the markets for solar and battery technology to store renewable power continue to grow. Simply put, more renewable energy will save Nevadans more money on their electric bills.

These reasons are why nurses and doctors, businesses and environmental groups, veterans, urban and rural leaders all agree that voting yes on Question 6 is good for Nevada.

Question 6 should not be confused with the other energy measure on the ballot. Question 6 is about what type of power you get. Question 3 is about who provides it in the future. The measures do not work in tandem nor is one dependent upon the other.

However, Question 6 is the guaranteed way to bring more renewable energy into the state, which will lead to healthier families, cleaner air, affordable electricity and more local jobs. That’s why we urge Nevada voters to vote YES on 6 tomorrow.


Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association

Adam Browning, Vote Solar Action Fund

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