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Tell the USTR: No New Solar Tariffs

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The Office of the United States Trade Representative is currently accepting public comments regarding the Section 201 solar trade case. Any new tariffs would severely limit the growth potential for solar in the United States and put tens of thousands of American jobs at risk. The USTR needs to hear from solar workers, consumers and advocates about the significant damage this case would cause.

We need you to raise your voice and tell the US Trade Representative that tariffs and government intervention is the wrong approach for the solar industry. You can write your own comment if you'd like, but to make it easier on you, we've included some suggested language below. Feel free to simply copy and paste the letter below, or personalize it to tell your own story. 

Dear Ambassador Lighthizer,

As you consider the solar cell and module market, I wanted to let you know my view. Recommendations made by the U.S. International Trade Commission could jeopardize tens of thousands of solar jobs across the country.

Tariffs would raise the cost of solar, slash demand and kill American jobs. The solar industry is an economic engine that is growing 17 times faster than the rest of the U.S. economy, employs more than 260,000 American workers and has added more than 100,000 blue-collar jobs to the economy in the last five years. Last year, the industry created 1 out of every 50 new U.S. jobs.

Rather than helping establish U.S. manufacturing, trade relief in this case would kill manufacturing jobs across the supply chain. The U.S. has a growing solar manufacturing sector with 38,000 workers making everything from sun trackers and inverters, to U.S. steel-made framing and racking systems.

Recently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said solar would be the fastest-growing occupation in America over the next 10 years – but that’s only if the administration rejects tariffs that will artificially make solar more expensive. Please protect American jobs and support continued economic growth in the solar industry by rejecting trade relief in this ill-suited Section 201 case.