Skip to main content

Selling Into the Sun: Price Premium Analysis of a Multi-State Dataset of Solar Homes

Share
Executive Summary:
 
Capturing the value that solar photovoltaic (PV) systems may add to home sales transactions is increasingly important. Our study enhances the PV-home-valuation literature by more than doubling the number of PV home sales analyzed (22,822 homes in total, 3,951 of which are PV) and examining transactions in eight states that span the years 2002–2013. We find that home buyers are consistently willing to pay PV home premiums across various states, housing and PV markets, and home types; average premiums across the full sample equate to approximately $4/W or $15,000 for an average-sized 3.6-kW PV system. Only a small and non-statistically significant difference exists between PV premiums for new and existing homes, though some evidence exists of new home PV system discounting. A PV green cachet might exist, i.e., home buyers might pay a certain amount for any size of PV system and some increment more depending on system size. The market appears to depreciate the value of PV systems in their first 10 years at a rate exceeding the rate of PV efficiency losses and the rate of straightline depreciation over the asset’s useful life. Net cost estimates—which account for government and utility PV incentives—may be the best proxy for market premiums, but income-based estimates may perform equally well if they accurately account for the complicated retail rate structures that exist in some states. Although this study focuses only on host-owned PV systems, future analysis should focus on homes with third-party-owned PV systems.
Resource Type

Browse Resources by Related Topics:

Related Resources

Wednesday, Oct 16, 2019

Updating Building Codes Cost-Effectively With Solar

What you need to know about solar energy treatment as your jurisdiction updates to newer versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)

Read More
Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019

2019 Solar ITC Impact Analysis

According to Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables, an extension of the solar investment tax credit would result in an additional 82 gigawatts (GW) of solar deployment over the next ten years, which would drive $87 billion in economic investment and create 113,000 U.S. solar jobs. 

Read More