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Solar Jobs Census 2017

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Each year, The Solar Foundation releases its National Solar Jobs Census, a report that tracks employment in the U.S. solar industry. It is the most comprehensive analysis of the solar labor market in the United States, and is a critical resource in educating policymakers and the general public about the economic impact of solar energy. 

In 2017, the census reported its first decline in solar jobs since its inception 8 years ago. As of November 2017, the solar industry employs 250,271 workers in the United States, a 3.8% decline over 2016. This decrease is largely due to a record year of installations in 2016 on the heels of the extension of the federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC), as well as delays and postponed projects due to uncertainty around the newly appointed Section 201 tariffs.

Solar job growth 2010-2017

Importantly, the long-term trend for solar jobs in the U.S. remains very strong. Solar employment has grown 168% since 2010, from just over 93,000 jobs to more than 250,000 jobs in all 50 states. In addition, the solar industry represents an American economic success story for small and local businesses: 78% of solar companies have 50 employees or less.

78% of solar companies have 50 employees or less

You can download the infographic from the 2017 census below, as well as head over to The Solar Foundation's website to access more resources and download the full report. 

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The Solar Foundation

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