Community Solar http://www.seia.org/ en America Exceeds Five Million Solar Installations Nationwide http://www.seia.org/news/5million <span>America Exceeds Five Million Solar Installations Nationwide</span> <span><span>[email protected]</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/16/2024 - 05:05</span> Thu, 16 May 2024 09:05:15 +0000 [email protected] 14665208 at http://www.seia.org The Solar Century: Landmark Moments in the History of Solar Energy http://www.seia.org/blog/solar-century-landmark-moments-history-solar-energy <span>The Solar Century: Landmark Moments in the History of Solar Energy</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Mon, 04/29/2024 - 16:24</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >SEIA Comms Team</div> </div> <div class="field field_image" > <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/2024-04/Bell_Solar_Battery_.jpg" width="800" height="566" alt="The Bell Solar Battery" /> </div> <div class="field body" ><p><a href="https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/news/solar-materials-future-great-performance-what-about-toxicity/"><em>The Bell Solar Battery</em></a></p><p>The history of solar energy is an American success story.</p><p>Since the creation of the first silicon solar cell 70 years ago, solar leaders have been innovating, improving efficiency, lowering costs, and growing this American-born technology into an essential part of our nation’s energy system.  </p><p>In 2023, solar accounted for over 50% of new electricity generating capacity added to the grid and employs over 260,000 Americans. With over 179 GW of installed capacity and growing, the solar and storage industry has become an American energy powerhouse.</p><p>The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has been at the forefront of the solar revolution for the last 50 years. As SEIA continues to fight for the expansion of reliable, low-cost solar power, here is a look back at significant solar milestones over the last 70 years.</p><p><strong>1954: </strong><a href="https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy04osti/33947.pdf"><strong>Bell Labs</strong></a><strong> Introduces the First Silicon Solar Cells</strong></p><p> </p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><a href="https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/news/solar-materials-future-great-performance-what-about-toxicity/"><img data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="f2fac408-344b-4500-b38b-45d89c924414" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Screenshot%202024-04-26%20105009%201.png" width="64.25%" height="631" loading="lazy" /></a> <figcaption><a href="https://store.nytimes.com/products/new-york-times-front-page-reprint?variant=35826434120"><em>The New York Times Front Page, April 26, 1954</em></a></figcaption></figure><p>In April 1954, Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson made the first silicon-based solar cell at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. While <a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/sponsored/brief-history-solar-panels-180972006/">other types of solar cells have existed since the 1880s</a>, these new silicon solar cells produced power five times more efficiently, setting the stage for the future of solar energy. On April 26, 1954, The New York Times covered the story on its front page. The article called the invention “the beginning of a new era, leading eventually to the realization of one of mankind’s most cherished dreams — the harnessing of the almost limitless energy of the sun for the uses of civilization.”</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>1960: </strong><a href="https://halcolenergy.com.au/solar-news/a-brief-history-of-solar-panels/"><strong>Hoffman Electronics</strong></a><strong> Creates 14% Efficient Solar Panel</strong></p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="edf4d575-facf-4f5a-b243-974d02a153fc" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Picture3_1.png" width="342" height="257" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><a href="https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/nmah_706157"><em>Hoffman Electronics Corp. Trans-Solar Radio, 1960</em></a></figcaption></figure><p>Over the next six years, researchers improved solar cell efficiency as businesses and <a href="https://solarmuseum.org/history-of-early-solar-powered-radios/#:~:text=April%2025%2C%201954&amp;text=The%20inventors%20are%20Gerald%20Pearson%2C%20Calvin%20Fuller%2C%20and%20Daryl%20Chapin.">manufacturers began to develop more advanced solar technology</a>. <a href="https://solarmuseum.org/history-of-early-solar-powered-radios/#:~:text=April%2025%2C%201954&amp;text=The%20inventors%20are%20Gerald%20Pearson%2C%20Calvin%20Fuller%2C%20and%20Daryl%20Chapin.">Hoffman Electronics</a>, a manufacturer of radios, televisions, and solar cells, contributed several early breakthroughs in solar cell efficiency. In 1960, the corporation produced a 14% efficient solar cell — more than double the efficiency of the original silicon-based solar cells. Hoffman Electronics also mass-produced a range of solar-powered products, including a <a href="https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/nmah_706157">solar-powered radio</a>. </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>1961: The United Nations Holds “</strong><a href="https://digitallibrary.un.org/record/3833582?ln=en&amp;v=pdf"><strong>New Sources of Energy</strong></a><strong>” Conference</strong></p><p>As research on solar energy continued, governments began considering its implications on an international scale. The United Nations held a conference on applications of solar, wind, and geothermal energy in Rome from August 21-31, 1961. About half of all papers that were presented at the conference discussed applications of solar energy, showcasing an international effort to develop solar power.  </p><p><strong>1970: </strong><a href="https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/april-22/#:~:text=to%20this%20page-,Earth%20Day,sites%20across%20the%20United%20States."><strong>The First Earth Day</strong></a></p><p>Alongside early developments in clean, solar energy came an increasing concern for the environment. For many Americans, recent oil spills, polluting power plants, and wildlife extinctions highlighted the need for environmental protections. Sharing these concerns, Senator Gaylord Nelson and activist Denis Hayes promoted Earth Day as a day of environmental activism. 20 million people participated in demonstrations across the country on April 22, 1970, the first ever Earth Day, <a href="https://www.earthday.org/history/">ushering in the modern environmental movement</a>. </p><p class="text-align-center"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WbwC281uzUs?si=bdsr7dkoxzQmjyhr" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" referrerpolicy="strict-origin-when-cross-origin" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p> </p><p><strong>1973: “Solar One” Opens</strong></p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="cb4e5411-87a8-493d-873e-616c8a2ac1ab" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Picture4.png" width="247" height="195" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/pssr.200850056"><em>The Solar One house, 1973</em></a></figcaption></figure><p>Throughout the 1970s, innovators applied solar technology to ground-breaking projects, including solar homes. In 1973, researchers at the University of Delaware built <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/pssr.200850056">the first house to integrate solar photovoltaic cells</a>. The building, named "Solar One," used heat and electricity converted from sunlight.  </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>1974: </strong><a href="https://www.seia.org/history-seia"><strong>SEIA is Founded</strong></a></p><p>In 1974, six solar energy experts and pioneers met to establish the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) in Washington, DC. SEIA’s founders — Jim Edison, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/06/us/peter-glaser-who-envisioned-space-solar-power-dies-at-90.html">Peter Glazer</a>, <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/business/1978/04/26/solar-collector-firm-struggles-for-profits/7f0bcd41-0480-4605-8801-a385f3d174c3/">James Ince</a>, Yahya Safdari, Sam Taylor, and <a href="https://www.renewableenergymagazine.com/thermal/fred-morse-receives-2012-shc-solar-award">Fred Morse</a> — were among the first solar business leaders, solar energy researchers, and industry experts. They agreed the new trade association should be “broad-based” and support the “prompt, orderly, widespread, and open growth of solar energy resources now.” The U.S. solar industry faced several early obstacles as it was being established. However, SEIA soon began to play a central role in building a profitable solar industry, including working to integrate solar energy into the policies of the Carter Administration. Over the next 50 years, SEIA continued to support and advocate for solar energy, and now represents over 1,200 member companies in all sectors of the industry.</p><p><strong>1978: Congress Passes the </strong><a href="https://www.seia.org/research-resources/purpa-101"><strong>Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act</strong></a></p><p>Four years after SEIA’s founding, Congress passed the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), one of the first federal policies to promote renewable energy sources. The act, which followed the 1970s energy crisis, was meant to encourage energy diversity, reduce energy costs, and introduce competition in the electric sector. The legislation birthed the concept of independent power producers and set the stage for modern energy markets.  </p><p><strong>1979: Jimmy Carter Installs Solar Panels on White House</strong></p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2bd623b9-d496-49d9-a148-344f7bb836f2" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Picture5.png" width="344" height="276" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><a href="https://www.whitehousehistory.org/the-white-house-gets-solar-panels"><em>Solar Panels on the White House, June 20, 1979</em></a></figcaption></figure><p>In a historic gesture, President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the White House roof. <a href="https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2008/11/jimmy-carters-solar-panels/">During his presidency</a>, Carter fought for clean energy use amidst an energy crisis and an increasing concern for climate change. At the dedication ceremony, Carter told the crowd: “Solar energy will not pollute our air or water. We will not run short of it. No one can ever embargo the Sun or interrupt its delivery to us. But we must work together to turn our vision and our dream into a solar reality.” </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p class="text-align-center"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VgZc2emYJs8?si=KZV2jq3X-WN7r-ck" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" referrerpolicy="strict-origin-when-cross-origin" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p> </p><p><strong>1982: First Utility-Scale Solar Farm in U.S. Begins Operation</strong></p><p>The Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) pioneered utility-scale solar power generation in 1982. ARCO opened a 1.1 megawatt (MW) operation in Hesperia, California, the first industrial solar power plant in the country. The company later opened a larger, 5.2 MW solar power plant in Carrizo Plain, California. The plant in Carrizo Plain operated from 1983 to 1994 and had one of the largest photovoltaic arrays in the world.  </p><p><strong>1983: First State Net-Energy Metering (NEM) Program </strong> </p><p>As solar became more practical, states began to implement the first net metering programs to compensate residential and commercial solar customers for the excess energy they export back to the grid. Minnesota became the first state to enact a net metering law in 1983, allowing solar consumers generating less than 40 kilowatts to receive export compensation. The policy was among the first to incentivize and support the installation of distributed solar energy systems. </p><p><strong>2004: First Solar Power International Conference</strong></p><p>SEIA and the solar industry continued to expand throughout the 1980s and 1990s. In 2004, SEIA and the Solar Electric Power Association united to organize the first Solar Power Conference, later renamed Solar Power International and then RE+. The San Francisco event attracted over 1,000 attendees, including industry leaders, utility representatives, and policymakers. Today, the event attracts over 40,000 attendees annually.</p><p><strong>2005: The Energy Policy Act of 2005 Passes</strong></p><p>The Energy Policy Act of 2005 was a landmark achievement for SEIA and the solar industry. Following SEIA's steadfast advocacy, the law included the solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC). The solar ITC has proven to be the most important federal policy to support solar growth in the United States, driving hundreds of thousands of new jobs and billions of dollars of investments. Since 2005, SEIA has successfully advocated for multiple extensions of the ITC, including its long-term extension in the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022. Since the passage of the Energy Policy Act, the solar industry has grown by over 200x.</p><p><strong>2006: First Community Solar Program Launches</strong></p><figure role="group" class="align-right"><img data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="749e6772-b83f-4779-be21-cee6c51e1890" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/4224_160608_154433%20v%202.jpg" width="300" height="200" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><a href="https://www.solrenview.com/SolrenView/mainFr.php?siteId=4224"><em>Renewable Energy Park, 2006</em></a></figcaption></figure><p>The same year that the ITC was enacted, the city of Ellensburg, Washington installed a new community solar facility — the first of its kind in the nation. The community solar project generated 110 kilowatts of energy, allowing local residents to access the cost-saving benefits of solar energy even if they can’t install it directly on their roof. </p><p> </p><p><strong>2008: U.S. Solar Capacity Reaches 1 GW</strong></p><p>With improving technology, falling costs, and federal policy support, the United States officially eclipsed one gigawatt of solar electric generating capacity in 2008. California accounted for half of all installed solar capacity at the time.</p><p><strong>2011: SunShot Initiative Launches</strong></p><p>To help the growing U.S. solar industry become more competitive, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched their “SunShot” initiative in 2011. The initiative aimed to lower solar energy costs by 75% by the end of the decade, bringing large-scale solar costs on par with other forms of energy. With increased economic competitiveness, the DOE looked to expand domestic solar installations and re-establish U.S. leadership in the global solar market. </p><p><strong>2013: President Obama Installs Solar Panels on White House</strong></p><p>Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama <a href="https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/19/fact-sheet-obama-administration-announces-clean-energy-savings-all">promoted clean energy and pushed for action on climate change</a>. In 2013, he released a <a href="https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/image/president27sclimateactionplan.pdf">Climate Action Plan</a> calling for a historic expansion of clean energy and setting ambitious targets for solar power. To showcase his support for solar, Obama became the third U.S. president to install solar at the White House, following former presidents Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush.</p><p class="text-align-center"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ORni8uiuslI?si=nxj6u3EIRM8v1fa-" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" referrerpolicy="strict-origin-when-cross-origin" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p> </p><p><strong>2015: U.S. Solar Industry Surpasses 200,000 Workers</strong></p><p>With federal policies supporting the growing solar industry, the U.S. <a href="https://www.seia.org/blog/2010s-solar-milestones">surpassed</a> 200,000 solar workers in 2015, marking a record-breaking year for the industry. The solar workforce continued to rise, providing well-paying, family-supporting jobs to communities across the country.</p><p><strong>2015: First U.S. City Reaches 100% Renewable Power</strong></p><p>Burlington, Vermont became <a href="https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/11/burlington-what-works-green-energy-214463/">the first city in the country</a> to be entirely powered by renewable sources in September 2014. Today, Vermont gets 19% of its electricity from solar energy.  </p><p><strong>2015: First State Sets 100% Renewable Electricity Goal</strong></p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/hawaii%20solar_1.jpg" data-entity-uuid="f0a4095f-0593-45d7-95aa-074fe9a9d4d3" data-entity-type="file" width="53.58%" class="align-right" height="461" loading="lazy" /><p>Hawaii set a precedent in 2015 by becoming the first state to pass <a href="https://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sessions/session2015/bills/HB623_CD1_.pdf">a goal to reach 100% renewable electricity</a>. The <a href="https://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sessions/session2015/bills/HB623_CD1_.pdf">plan</a> increased the state’s initial goal of 70% clean energy by 2030 to 100% renewable electricity by 2045, with solar contributing a significant portion. Today, <a href="https://www.cesa.org/projects/100-clean-energy-collaborative/guide/table-of-100-clean-energy-states/">23 states</a> have a 100% clean energy goal. </p><p><strong>2016: </strong><a href="https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/solar-achievements-timeline#:~:text=The%20U.S.%20solar%20energy%20industry,work%20at%20the%20SunShot%20Initiative."><strong>The U.S. Reaches 1 Million Solar Installations  </strong></a></p><p>Four decades after the first grid-connected solar installation, the <a href="https://www.seia.org/news/us-solar-market-grows-95-2016-smashes-records#:~:text=As%20a%20result%20of%20a,capacity%20of%20over%2040%20gigawatts.">U.S. solar industry</a> hit a major milestone in 2016 when it surpassed 1 million solar installations. It was so significant that <a href="https://twitter.com/BarackObama/status/727498012004638720">even President Obama was impressed</a>.  </p><p>Solar continued to grow at record speed, reaching 2 million installations just 3 years later.</p><p><strong>2017: </strong><a href="https://www.utilitydive.com/news/report-utility-scale-solar-prices-drop-below-1watt-for-first-time/444738/"><strong>Utility-Scale Solar Costs Falls Below $1/Watt</strong></a></p><p>In 2017, the U.S. solar industry <a href="https://www.energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-achievement-sunshot-goal-new-focus-solar-energy-office">hit a “SunShot” Initiative goal</a> three years ahead of schedule when average utility-scale solar prices fell below $1/watt for the first time ever.  Considering this early success, the DOE began looking towards their <a href="https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/sunshot-2030">SunShot 2030</a> goals, which aims <a href="https://www.energy.gov/eere/articles/energy-department-announces-more-90-achievement-2020-sunshot-goal-sets-sights-2030">to reduce the cost of solar-generated electricity by 50%</a> between 2020 and 2030.  </p><p><strong>2022: Congress Enacts the </strong><a href="https://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/Inflation%20Reduction%20Act%20Summary%20PDF.pdf"><strong>Inflation Reduction Act</strong></a></p><p>In August of 2022, President Biden signed the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) into law, supercharging clean energy investments and transforming the future of the U.S. solar industry. <a href="https://www.seia.org/research-resources/impact-inflation-reduction-act">SEIA and Wood Mackenzie</a> predict that the IRA will lead to more than half a trillion dollars of new solar investments by 2030. Truly transformational.</p><p><strong>2023: Solar Accounts for Over 50% of New Electricity Capacity Added to the Grid</strong></p><p><a href="https://www.seia.org/news/solar-installations-skyrocket-2023-record-setting-first-full-year-inflation-reduction-act">Solar accounted for over 50% of new electricity capacity added to the grid in 2023</a> with a record-shattering 32.4 GW of new installations. This marks the first time in 80 years that a renewable electricity source has accounted for over half of annual capacity additions. Expect this trend to continue in the years ahead.  </p><p><strong>2024: SEIA Celebrates 50 Years</strong></p><p>SEIA has been at the forefront of each of these milestones over the last 50 years, championing countless policies and initiatives to establish the multi-billion-dollar solar and storage industry we know today.</p><p>Solar is the fastest-growing sector of the energy industry, and SEIA will continue to lead the way to deliver greater economic opportunities, lower energy bills, and a more resilient and reliable grid. </p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/federal-state-regulatory-policy" hreflang="en">Federal, State &amp; Regulatory Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-investment-tax-credit" hreflang="en">Solar Investment Tax Credit</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-equity" hreflang="en">Climate &amp; Equity</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/diversity-equity-inclusion" hreflang="en">Diversity, Equity &amp; Inclusion</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-technologies" hreflang="en">Solar Technologies</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <h3 class="field__label inline">Tags</h3> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/tags/seia" hreflang="en">SEIA</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Mon, 29 Apr 2024 20:24:55 +0000 techols 14665166 at http://www.seia.org Leading the Charge: The Top 5 Solar States of 2023 http://www.seia.org/blog/leading-charge-top-5-solar-states-2023 <span>Leading the Charge: The Top 5 Solar States of 2023</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Thu, 03/07/2024 - 14:41</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >SEIA Comms Team</div> </div> <div class="field body" ><p>Solar is coming off a landmark, record-shattering year in 2023.  </p><p>For the first time in history, solar accounted for <a href="https://www.seia.org/news/solar-installations-skyrocket-2023-record-setting-first-full-year-inflation-reduction-act">over half of all new electricity capacity</a> added to the grid, and nearly 800,000 American homes installed a new solar or solar + storage system.</p><p>While federal clean energy policies played a major role in driving this growth, the work happening at the state level is the untold story of America’s favorite energy source in 2023. Today, 26 states and Puerto Rico have at least 1 gigawatt (GW) of installed solar capacity, up from just 14 states five years ago. This solar power boom is bringing wide-reaching benefits to communities nationwide, creating thousands of jobs, lowering household electricity bills, boosting grid resiliency, and uplifting local economies.  </p><p>To celebrate this momentous year, SEIA is counting down the top five solar states of 2023 — all of which are positioning themselves as national leaders in America’s energy economy.</p><img data-entity-uuid="77de3c0d-187c-416d-92b4-0c27b8902f0e" data-entity-type="file" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/1_0.png" width="1600" height="550" loading="lazy" /><p> </p><p>Ohio is back in the top ten solar states for the first time in over a decade, and its fifth-place finish in 2023 is its highest rank to date. New solar capacity in the state increased by a whopping 1,230% year-over-year, with 1.3 GW installed.  </p><p>Utility-scale solar investments are driving this growth, with over 3 GW across 20 projects in the pipeline for development, including projects that <a href="https://www.statenews.org/news/2023-11-30/utility-scale-solar-could-be-a-big-win-for-ohios-livestock-farmers">pair solar with Ohio’s robust agricultural sector</a> and livestock farms.  </p><p>Ohio is also a longtime leader in solar manufacturing and is <a href="https://spectrumnews1.com/oh/columbus/news/2023/05/06/solar-panel-manufacturing-booming-in-ohio">poised to continue growing this market</a> as the United States builds out its domestic solar supply chain.  </p><img data-entity-uuid="febd6576-b1bc-4d1e-b132-53c348cf1739" data-entity-type="file" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/2_0.png" width="1600" height="550" loading="lazy" /><p> </p><p>For the first time since 2010, Colorado is back in the top 5 solar states in 2023 with 1.6 GW installed, nearly ten times more than it installed in 2022.  </p><p>Last year, Governor Jared Polis <a href="https://coloradonewsline.com/2023/05/11/polis-clean-energy-utility-regulation/">signed a major law to boost clean energy deployment</a> in Colorado, setting the stage for the state to continue leading the nation’s clean energy economy. Colorado boasts strong numbers across all the major solar market segments and is also home to the <a href="https://www.worldrecordacademy.org/2023/4/worlds-largest-solar-powered-steel-plant-world-record-in-pueblo-colorado-423186">world’s largest solar-powered steel plant</a>. </p><img data-entity-uuid="0b21782c-0d58-4118-8018-7e48b1e960d7" data-entity-type="file" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/3.png" width="1600" height="550" loading="lazy" /><p> </p><p>Florida maintained its spot as the number three solar state for the fifth straight year, adding a record 3.2 GW of new solar capacity in 2023. The aptly named Sunshine State saw over 50,000 residents install a new solar system on their home last year. Nearly half of Florida’s 220,000 residential solar systems were installed in the last two years.  </p><p>Florida communities are increasingly turning to solar power for the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-solutions/2024/01/06/leed-zero-energy-hunters-point/">cost-savings</a> and <a href="https://nextcity.org/urbanist-news/what-we-can-learn-from-one-florida-community-about-climate-resilience">resilience benefits it provides</a> in the wake of worsening tropical storms and hurricanes.  </p><img data-entity-uuid="ee90e4a4-2e79-4f84-8560-83d8b2b2fda7" data-entity-type="file" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/4.png" width="1600" height="550" loading="lazy" /><p> </p><p>For the second time in the last three years, California missed out on the top spot in the state solar rankings for 2023. Even though it installed a strong 6.2 GW of new solar capacity, recent regulatory decisions from the California Public Utilities Commission have <a href="https://www.seia.org/blog/new-reality-path-forward-californias-solar-and-storage-industry">significantly damaged California’s rooftop solar sector</a>. In total, the state’s solar market is expected to decline 36% across all market segments in 2024.</p><p>California remains the largest solar market in the nation with 46.9 GW of installed capacity, enough to power nearly 14 million homes. State leaders must step up to encourage more solar and storage adoption in the near- and long-term if California is going to meet its 2030 clean energy goals. </p><img data-entity-uuid="5fc82a76-4a6b-455d-9174-c0e03310d4c1" data-entity-type="file" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/5.png" width="1600" height="550" loading="lazy" /><p> </p><p>Everything is bigger in Texas — especially the solar industry.</p><p>Texas was at the top of the solar leaderboard in 2023, installing more solar than any other state. Since 2021, Texas has installed over 15 GW of new solar capacity which is more solar than the entire United States installed in 2019.  </p><p>From 2024-2034, Texas will lead the nation with nearly 100 GW of new solar capacity additions, outpacing the next closest state by a two-to-one margin.</p><p>Energy storage is ramping up across Texas as well, with <a href="https://www.canarymedia.com/articles/energy-storage/texas-will-add-more-grid-batteries-than-any-other-state-in-2024">more grid-scale battery capacity expected than any other state</a> in 2024.  </p><p><em>Learn more about the latest trends for the U.S. solar and storage industry in SEIA and Wood Mackenzie’s </em><a href="http://seia.org/smi"><em>Solar Market Insight 2023 Year in Review</em></a><em> report. </em></p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/state-solar-policy" hreflang="en">State Solar Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/domestic-manufacturing" hreflang="en">Domestic Manufacturing</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <h3 class="field__label inline">Tags</h3> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/tags/state-policy" hreflang="en">State Policy</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/solar-market-insight" hreflang="en">Solar Market Insight</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/texas" hreflang="en">Texas</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/california" hreflang="en">California</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/florida" hreflang="en">Florida</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/colorado" hreflang="en">Colorado</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/ohio" hreflang="en">Ohio</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/solar-data" hreflang="en">Solar Data</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/storage" hreflang="en">Storage</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Thu, 07 Mar 2024 19:41:29 +0000 techols 14664838 at http://www.seia.org Solar Industry Statement on CPUC Community Solar Decision http://www.seia.org/news/solar-industry-statement-cpuc-community-solar-decision <span>Solar Industry Statement on CPUC Community Solar Decision</span> <span><span>[email protected]</span></span> <span>Tue, 03/05/2024 - 18:45</span> Tue, 05 Mar 2024 23:45:16 +0000 [email protected] 14664835 at http://www.seia.org Clean Energy in Your Community: Solar Powers America’s Hospitals, Churches, and Rec Centers http://www.seia.org/blog/clean-energy-your-community-solar-powers-americas-hospitals-churches-and-rec-centers <span>Clean Energy in Your Community: Solar Powers America’s Hospitals, Churches, and Rec Centers</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/02/2023 - 11:12</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >SEIA Comms Team</div> </div> <div class="field field_image" > <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/2023-10/tenthstreetchurch.jpg" width="800" height="500" alt="Solar panels at Tenth Street Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Photo by ep_jhu, licensed under Creative Commons. " /> </div> <div class="field body" ><p><em>Solar panels at Tenth Street Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Photo by </em><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ep_jhu/35086362693/in/photolist-2bKeTZz-Xh8ibd-XX2Dvp-9i7UEx-2nzZARj-8wFBUb-VssMeP-XWSbcz-HjzdwR-hCV2VQ"><em>ep_jhu</em></a><em>, licensed under Creative Commons.</em></p><p>In many communities, hospitals, places of worship, and recreation centers play a vital role in bringing people together and helping in times of need.  </p><p>Now, community centers are turning to solar and storage to provide power and are exploring new solar savings and benefit-sharing models along the way.</p><p>Here’s what this looks like across the country.  </p><p><strong>Solar Powers Places of Worship</strong>  </p><p>Thanks to new federal clean energy incentives, <a href="https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2023/07/25/new-game-changing-incentives-open-way-for-more-churches-to-fill-gaps-in-community-solar/">places of worship are adopting solar faster</a> than ever before. Previously, only homeowners and commercial entities could claim the incentives, but under the new law, nonprofits and places of worship can now use them to cut down on the upfront costs of going solar.  </p><p>Some churches are even sharing their solar savings with the community.  </p><p>In Washington, DC, Sargent Memorial Presbyterian’s solar array was <a href="https://groundswell.org/project/community-solar-at-sargent-memorial/">completed earlier this year with support from local groups</a>, including SunLight General Capital, a woman-owned solar investment firm, and SunCatch Energy, a Black-owned solar installation company. In addition to meeting the church’s energy needs, the system is also <a href="https://www.washingtoninformer.com/northeast-church-installs-over-400-solar-panels-above-its-parking-lot/">providing up to $500 a year in energy savings for 73 households</a>.  </p><p>Solar is also aiding community service missions for places of worship.  </p><p>Many churches with solar + storage systems are serving as resilience hubs for community members, so that in the case of power outages and natural disasters, people can go to the church for safety, shelter, and reliable electricity.  </p><p>Glad Tidings International Church, located near Oakland, CA, <a href="https://faithfullymagazine.com/clean-energy-hub-black-churches/">broke ground in June on their solar-powered microgrid</a>, aiming to soon provide clean power for their operations while saving over $30,000 a year on energy costs. The savings are going towards building a new community center, that combined with the backup power provided by the solar microgrid’s battery storage, will help the church serve as a resilience center for the community during power outages and other emergencies.  </p><p>“At the point where we are, there are shortages of water, shortages of energy, the heat… it affects everybody that’s here,” said Bishop Jerry Macklin, pastor of Good Tidings, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICUSPStBnVw">in a video</a> highlighting his church’s effort to adopt solar energy.  “I think now people are beginning to understand that this is everybody’s problem, and everybody has to be a part of the solution.”</p><p><strong>Reliable Solar Energy for Healthcare Centers</strong>  </p><p>Hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare centers must have access to constant and resilient energy sources, especially during weather emergencies and natural disasters.  </p><p>Earlier this year, the Centers for Medicare &amp; Medicaid Services changed federal regulations to <a href="https://www.greenbiz.com/article/hospitals-get-green-light-green-backup-power">allow U.S. hospitals to use clean energy</a> to power their backup generators, paving the way for hospitals to run their operations with clean energy around the clock and during times of emergency.  </p><p>These new regulations, combined with the reliability and lower costs that clean energy sources provide, are prompting a growing number of hospitals and healthcare centers across America to pursue solar.</p><p>Southern Illinois Healthcare is using <a href="https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2023/02/28/illinois-hospital-network-signs-up-for-community-solar/">community solar to power its multi-hospital system</a> in Carbondale, Illinois. By participating in the community solar program with nearby residents, the hospitals are offsetting their energy costs dollar for dollar, saving $119,000 per year on electricity, and improving their overall sustainability.</p><p>To defend against blackouts caused by heatwaves, the San Benito Health Foundation in Hollister, CA, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/oct/13/solar-healthcare-clinics-climate-change-california-san-benito">installed a solar + storage microgrid</a> to provide nearly all of its energy needs as well as a week’s worth of backup power. About 90% of the clinic’s patients are people of color without health insurance, making San Benito an important lifeline in the community.  </p><p>“We hope that this will serve as a model for other community health centers,” said Rosa Vivian Fernandez, chief executive of San Benito.</p><p>As solar continues to grow, communities of all sizes, in all fifty states, are increasingly realizing the benefits of solar.  </p><p>Solar supports healthy lives and cleaner air and does so while easing costs and strengthening the grid. Whether it is in schools, homes, places of worship, hospitals, or elsewhere, solar is powering abundant, clean energy in communities across the country. </p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/health-safety" hreflang="en">Health &amp; Safety</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <h3 class="field__label inline">Tags</h3> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/tags/residential-solar" hreflang="en">Residential Solar</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/energy-storage" hreflang="en">Energy Storage</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Mon, 02 Oct 2023 15:12:00 +0000 techols 14664474 at http://www.seia.org Purposeful, Proactive Growth: Navigating Long-Term Challenges in the Solar and Storage Industry http://www.seia.org/blog/purposeful-proactive-growth-navigating-long-term-challenges-solar-and-storage-industry <span>Purposeful, Proactive Growth: Navigating Long-Term Challenges in the Solar and Storage Industry</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/13/2023 - 09:16</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >SEIA Comms Team</div> </div> <div class="field field_image" > <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/2023-09/LongTermBlog.jpeg" width="1920" height="1277" alt="Member of the solar workforce." /> </div> <div class="field body" ><p>America’s solar and storage industry is — by any metric — booming. While this growth has been quick, it has not been haphazard.  </p><p>This expansion is underpinned by the industry’s steadfast commitment to purposeful, proactive growth.  </p><p>Three years into the Solar+ Decade, the solar and storage industry has achieved unprecedented momentum resulting from the Inflation Reduction Act, with more than $20 billion invested in domestic manufacturing.  </p><p>But in order for solar and storage to comprise 30% of U.S. electricity generation by 2030, the industry must proactively address the economic, political, and environmental challenges that lie ahead.</p><p>The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) is helping to chart this path forward and create solutions that will build on our progress and rocket us to our 2030 goals.</p><p><strong>Expanding the Workforce</strong></p><p>To meet these ambitious goals, the solar workforce must grow from 263,000 Americans today to over one million workers by the end of the decade. To do this, the industry must focus our efforts on equitably hiring, training and retaining the next generation of workers.  </p><p>According to the <a href="https://www.seia.org/news/jobs-census-shows-resilient-inclusive-employment-growth-gen-z-flocks-us-solar-industry">National Solar Jobs Census</a>, America’s solar workforce is already attracting younger workers and outpaces the rest of the economy when it comes to hiring Gen Z workers. While the United States still has a long way to go, it’s clear that workers see the solar and storage sector as a stable source of good, family-supporting careers.  </p><p>We must also focus on retaining these workers and creating clear pathways for promotion and other wealth building and business ownership opportunities.  </p><p>The first step in delivering these opportunities is benchmarking our progress. For the first time in four years, the industry has launched a new workforce satisfaction survey to help identify opportunity and equity gaps to ensure everyone has access to a successful career in this industry. The results of the survey will serve as an important foundation as we strive to grow the solar workforce to four times its current size by the end of the decade.  </p><p><strong>Connecting to the Grid</strong></p><p>To date, more than 2 terawatts of generation and storage are waiting for the greenlight to connect to the grid. This process, known as interconnection, is one of the biggest things holding back the clean energy transition.  </p><p>In July 2023, the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/27/climate/electric-grid-ferc-bottleneck.html">Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) took a big step forward by issuing Order No. 2023</a> which contains new rules that could significantly reduce interconnection delays if they’re implemented properly. The fixes could help interconnection customers make more informed decisions before entering the queue and help to promote accountability for utilities and transmission providers by setting firm study deadlines, creating enforceable requirements, and establishing penalties for failing to evaluate an interconnection application in a timely manner.  </p><p>But these reforms are just the beginning.  </p><p>To reduce interconnection delays across the country, we must focus on creating a clear, transparent, and efficient process for generators and transmission owners alike. Right now, the interconnection process for developers is largely a blind process and all parties involved need better information about grid conditions and capacity constraints. In addition, fairness and accountability must be at the heart of any reforms as monopoly utilities and transmission owners currently have no incentives to process applications in a timely manner.    </p><p>And finally, these challenges aren’t happening in a vacuum. New innovations in artificial intelligence could help to speed study times without compromising the safety and reliability of the grid. In addition, recalculations of the withdrawal fee structure could go a long way in reforming the process.  </p><p><strong>Building a Circular Economy</strong></p><p>Like many other durable products and construction materials, PV modules can be reused or refurbished for a ‘second life’ of generating electricity for many more years.  </p><p>While the vast majority of America’s solar fleet will continue to operate for another 20-30 years in the field, recycling, refurbishing, and reusing solar energy systems are an essential part of building a sustainable economy.  </p><p>Several SEIA members already operate take-back and recycling programs, and SEIA’s <a href="https://www.seia.org/initiatives/seia-national-pv-recycling-program">National PV Recycling Program</a> is helping connect installers, developers, and distributors with a network of recycling and refurbishment organizations. This network is able to meet today’s recycling needs, and SEIA is focused on scaling its current recycling capacity to meet the long-term needs of the industry.  </p><p>In addition, SEIA supports PV recycling research and programs that can help to introduce more innovation and market competition. This will help to scale new recycling technologies and lower costs as the solar industry builds a fully circular economy.  </p><p><strong>Raising the Standard</strong></p><p>As an ANSI-certified standards-developing organization, SEIA is creating national standards that will help the solar and storage industry proactively address many of its long-term challenges.  </p><p>The first standard SEIA is developing will focus on supply chains. The new traceability standard will help to ensure that the solar and storage industry ethically sources products and components. As the industry rapidly expands its domestic manufacturing capacity, strong standards will be a key tool in helping companies across the industry align their supply chains with their sustainability goals.  </p><p>If we reach our 2030 goals, more than 20 million homes will have solar energy. Millions of Americans will be considering solar for the first time over the next few years, making this a crucial time to invest in consumer education resources and national standards that will ensure the safe and reliable installation of all solar and energy storage systems.  </p><p>With more eyes on the solar and storage industry than ever before, collaborative, forward-looking industry standards will be crucial to both maintaining the industry’s momentum today and fortifying its foundation for the future.</p><p><strong>Looking Ahead</strong></p><p>From workforce development to PV recycling and interconnection to consumer protection, the solar and storage industry has always been proactive and intentional in its growth. The industry holds itself to a high standard and, as we strive to meet the goal of providing 30% of electricity generation by 2030, we must continue to address industry-wide challenges purposefully and strategically.</p><p>If we tackle these long-term challenges, we’ll make good on our promise to deliver an affordable, abundant, and homegrown clean energy future.</p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/federal-state-regulatory-policy" hreflang="en">Federal, State &amp; Regulatory Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/diversity-equity-inclusion" hreflang="en">Diversity, Equity &amp; Inclusion</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/managing-growth" hreflang="en">Managing Growth</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/workforce-development" hreflang="en">Workforce Development</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/land-use-solar-development" hreflang="en">Land Use &amp; Solar Development</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/domestic-manufacturing" hreflang="en">Domestic Manufacturing</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <h3 class="field__label inline">Tags</h3> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/tags/clean-energy-industry" hreflang="en">Clean Energy Industry</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/solar-jobs" hreflang="en">Solar Jobs</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/energy-storage" hreflang="en">Energy Storage</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/manufacturing" hreflang="en">Manufacturing</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Wed, 13 Sep 2023 13:16:04 +0000 techols 14664453 at http://www.seia.org Abigail Ross Hopper Delivers Remarks on the U.S. Solar and Storage Industry at RE+ 2023 http://www.seia.org/blog/abigail-ross-hopper-delivers-remarks-us-solar-and-storage-industry-re-2023 <span>Abigail Ross Hopper Delivers Remarks on the U.S. Solar and Storage Industry at RE+ 2023</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/11/2023 - 19:04</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >Abigail Ross Hopper</div> </div> <div class="field body" ><p class="text-align-center"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R2j37Jvtp44?si=Nq5GtYgGdSloNwAx" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p>Welcome to Las Vegas everyone!  </p><p>It’s wonderful to see so many familiar faces in the crowd, along with so many new ones — all of you are visionaries who have made our clean energy future our reality today. Whether you serve the residential, commercial, community or utility-scale segments of our industry, your work to advance our progress is incredible.  </p><p>Last year, we reveled in our legislative win that catapulted solar and storage investment into a new era — the Inflation Reduction Act. This law has had nothing short of an extraordinary impact on the way we do business and the rate at which we can realize progress.  </p><p>As a result of the Inflation Reduction Act, the U.S. solar and storage industry will add $565 billion to our economy over the next decade, creating another half a million jobs along the way.  </p><p>Because of your commitment to expanding access to residential solar power and investing in our communities, solar now powers hundreds of thousands of businesses and neighborhoods around the country and we are a major driving force behind the global economy. Through heat waves and natural disasters, we are literally keeping the lights on in homes that would otherwise have gone dark this summer.</p><p>Many of you know how radical a shift this is from where we were just a few years ago, but I want to point out a few key areas where that change is evident.  </p><ul><li><strong>Solar is one of the fastest-growing energy sources in the world.</strong> We are setting records nearly every quarter and those numbers are only going to increase.  </li><li>And with that power comes great responsibility to get things right.   </li><li><strong>We have, not just an opportunity, but a responsibility to establish American energy independence.</strong> To distance ourselves from the global demand for fossil fuels, creating a stronger energy foundation here at home. </li><li>Solar and storage is leading the way in delivering affordable, reliable, homegrown clean energy. </li><li>And finally, <strong>we must be intentional about building a clean energy future that uplifts everyone.</strong> We have a responsibility to make solar energy available in more communities that might be traditionally underrepresented and build an equitable and highly skilled workforce to help us deploy more clean energy and ramp up our domestic supply chain.</li></ul><p>Let’s talk about what that means for you.  </p><p><strong>#1: Unleashing American Energy Dominance  </strong></p><p>Solar and stoage is already a critical part of our electricity mix, helping to harden our infrastructure and upgrade our grid.  </p><p>As we all look to electrify and decarbonize the economy, we will need to invest in homegrown energy sources that strengthen our global competitiveness and unleash American energy dominance.  </p><p>You heard Senator Ossoff talk about the incredible opportunity of U.S. clean energy manufacturing, as a direct result of the IRA. As we onshore a larger percentage of our supply chain, America will become less reliant on foreign energy sources and our opportunity to export solar and storage technology will skyrocket. </p><p>Since the IRA passed, we’ve seen more than 59 solar manufacturing announcements. If all of these facilities come online by 2026, they would have the potential to meet 250% of our nation’s current demand for solar.</p><p>But with any quick growth come growing pains. We know our supply chain isn’t where it needs to be yet, so it’s critically important that we look for smart solutions to mitigate any challenges that could slow down the momentum that we’ve seen over the last five years.</p><p><strong>#2: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility  </strong></p><p>Solar and storage is now a much bigger part of our everyday lives. If we reach our 2030 goals, more than 20 million homes will have solar energy by that time. </p><p>Millions of Americans will be considering solar for the first time over the next few years, making this a crucial time to invest in consumer education resources and establishing national standards that will ensure the safe and efficient installation of all solar and storage systems.  </p><p>As we scale up, we must onshore the solar supply chain and double down on ethical labor practices.  </p><p>As a result of this IRA-fueled growth, we’re under a microscope. From state and county officials to local landowners, and your next-door neighbor, many have an opinion about how we should operate and it’s our job to establish policies that benefit our whole industry and fight back against those that don’t.  </p><p>It may seem small but rising to meet the expectations of doing good business, means creating a strong foundation for the industry.  Things like establishing the right installation standards which the Solar Energy Industries Association recently became accredited to do.  </p><p>An example of that scope of work includes providing the solar and storage industry with a first-of-its-kind standardized tool for tracing supply chain origination.  </p><p>This also means doubling down to educate consumers and policymakers on longer-term challenges like PV recycling and interconnection to make sure we develop the strongest possible foundation for solar for generations to come.  </p><p><strong>#3: Building an Abundant Clean Energy Future</strong></p><p>We also have limitless potential as an industry in the Solar+ Decade.  </p><p>We are creating abundant, affordable clean energy that can uplift all communities and people.  </p><p>This abundance mindset means cleaner air, better jobs, and a thriving economy. It also means creating wealth-building opportunities and pathways to business ownership in underrepresented communities.  </p><p>But we can’t just wish for progress — we must be intentional.  </p><p>We need a data-driven approach to benchmarking this progress.  </p><p>That is why I am proud to announce that for the first time in four years, SEIA will be investing in research to reveal equity and opportunity gaps to ensure everyone has access to a successful career in this industry. You’ll see QR codes throughout the event this week, including cards on your chair. This code links to our new workforce experience survey. Please take a few minutes to participate, so we can get a clear snapshot of where our industry stands to help us chart our path forward.  </p><p><strong>SEIA is the Leading the Transformation to Our Clean Energy Future…Today  </strong></p><p>To sum it all up, TOGETHER, with everyone in this room and those who couldn’t make it, the team at SEIA are building a clean energy future, today.  </p><p>SEIA will continue to be your partner throughout the Solar+ Decade and beyond.  </p><p>We will navigate you through this rapidly changing landscape and continue to chart the course for expanding our solar and storage industry and demystifying complicated rules. We will also continue to be fierce advocates for you in Washington and across the country.  </p><p>Welcome to the new era of affordable, abundant, and homegrown clean energy – let’s get to work!  </p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/federal-state-regulatory-policy" hreflang="en">Federal, State &amp; Regulatory Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-equity" hreflang="en">Climate &amp; Equity</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/managing-growth" hreflang="en">Managing Growth</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/trade-technology-manufacturing" hreflang="en">Trade, Technology &amp; Manufacturing</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Mon, 11 Sep 2023 23:04:06 +0000 techols 14664441 at http://www.seia.org Solar Installations in 2023 Expected to Exceed 30 GW for the First Time in History http://www.seia.org/news/solar-installations-2023-expected-exceed-30-gw-first-time-history <span>Solar Installations in 2023 Expected to Exceed 30 GW for the First Time in History</span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/07/2023 - 16:17</span> Thu, 07 Sep 2023 20:17:06 +0000 techols 14664432 at http://www.seia.org Solar Market Insight Report 2023 Q3 http://www.seia.org/research-resources/solar-market-insight-report-2023-q3 <span>Solar Market Insight Report 2023 Q3</span> <span><span>[email protected]</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/07/2023 - 00:00</span> <div class="field body" ><p>The quarterly SEIA/Wood Mackenzie Power &amp; Renewables U.S. Solar Market Insight report shows the major trends in the U.S. solar industry. Learn more about the U.S. Solar Market Insight Report. Released September 7, 2023.</p><h4>1.    Key figures</h4><ul><li>In Q2 2023, the US solar market installed 5.6 GW<sub>dc</sub> of capacity, a 20% increase from Q2 2022 and an 8% decrease from Q1 2023. With nearly 12 GW<sub>dc</sub> installed in the first half of the year, 2023 volumes are set to grow year-over-year, reversing the contraction the industry experienced in 2022. </li><li>Solar accounted for 45% of all new electricity-generating capacity added to the US grid in the first half of 2023.  </li><li>The residential segment bounced back from a slight dip last quarter to set a quarterly record at 1.8 GW<sub>dc</sub> of installations in Q2 2023. As the industry anticipated, California installations grew in advance of the mid-April change from net metering to net billing. We expect this installation surge to continue through the third quarter and begin to wane in the fourth quarter. </li><li>The commercial solar segment installed 345 MW<sub>dc</sub>, declining 9% compared to Q2 2022 and 20% compared to Q1 2023. While capacity decreased quarter-over-quarter, the total number of projects installed increased 7%, indicating relatively stable volumes for the segment.  </li><li>The community solar segment installed 226 MW<sub>dc</sub>, 16% less than in Q2 2022 and flat compared to last quarter. While there is considerable momentum for community solar development, installation volumes have stagnated in several states due to challenges around interconnection, growing market penetration, and siting and permitting. </li><li>The utility-scale segment installed 3.3 GW<sub>dc</sub> in Q2 2023, representing 22% growth from Q2 2022, and a 14% decline from Q1 2023. Despite the decline from Q1 2023 volumes, capacity in the second quarter builds on the 66% year-over-year growth seen in Q1 2023, demonstrating momentum from supply chain relief. Getting equipment to project sites is still a challenge but developers have been adapting their equipment sourcing strategies to get projects installed.</li><li>In the year since the IRA passed, module manufacturers have announced approximately three dozen capacity additions. If all of these plans materialize, the US (including Puerto Rico) will increase its total module manufacturing capacity by a significant order of magnitude by 2026 – from 10.6 GW to 108.5 GW. </li><li>After a 13% market contraction in 2022, Wood Mackenzie expects the solar industry to grow 52% this year, installing nearly 32 GW<sub>dc</sub> of capacity. A record 20 GW<sub>dc</sub> will be installed over the second half of the year, surpassing every annual total prior to 2021. Modest growth is expected across distributed solar, while the utility segment is set to almost double compared to last year.  </li><li>In our five-year outlook, annual growth in the solar industry will average 15%. Implementation of the IRA, which was enacted just over a year ago, has been slow and complicated. But the long-term policy certainty provided by the legislation continues to drive our expectations for double-digit growth in the solar industry.</li></ul><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%201.png" data-entity-uuid="b63de3af-f734-4018-b65d-5700bc2e1512" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 1" width="2002" height="943" loading="lazy" /></p><h4>2.    Introduction</h4><p><br />The US solar industry installed 5.6 gigawatts-direct current (GW<sub>dc</sub>) of capacity in the second quarter of 2023, a 20% increase from Q2 2022 and an 8% decrease from Q1 2023. The industry continues to recover slowly from the supply chain constraints it felt acutely in 2022. There is already nearly 12 GWdc of capacity online this year, compared to less than 8 GW<sub>dc</sub> in the first half of 2022.</p><p>After dipping slightly last quarter, the residential segment set another quarterly record with 1.8 GW<sub>dc</sub> installed. Volumes were supported by a record 607 MW<sub>dc</sub> installed in California due to demand pull-in ahead of the switch from net metering to the less favorable net billing regime. Commercial and community solar volumes declined or stagnated compared to the first quarter, reflecting the drawn-out impacts of interconnection delays, supply chain constraints, and uncertainty over IRA implementation. Utility-scale solar had another quarter of healthy growth, up 22% year-over-year. This helps bolster our expectations for nearly 23 GW<sub>dc</sub> of utility-scale solar in 2023. This growth has occurred despite persistent challenges for the utility-scale segment, including supply chain constraints, tight labor availability and uncertainty surrounding various IRA requirements.</p><p>Overall, photovoltaic solar (PV) accounted for 45% of all new electricity-generating capacity additions in the first half of 2023.</p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%202.png" data-entity-uuid="158a64fc-548b-4af0-8f90-21b7aecb33da" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 2" width="2210" height="1260" loading="lazy" /></p><h5>Second quarter solar installations reinforce our 52% growth outlook for 2023</h5><p>Healthy installation volumes in the first half of the year support our expectations for nearly 32 GW<sub>dc</sub> of capacity to come online this year. This will be a welcome return to growth. Annual solar additions contracted in 2022 due to intense supply chain constraints related to the pandemic, the Auxin anticircumvention case, and other regulatory trade action. This growth is predominantly driven by the utility-scale segment. Imports of solar modules have increased considerably compared to last year – module imports through the first half of the year reached 24.4 GW<sub>dc</sub> compared to only 11.4 GW<sub>dc</sub> in the first half of 2022. And Florida, a rapidly growing market for utility-scale solar, has already installed more than 2 GW<sub>dc</sub> of capacity in the first half of the year. These factors have led to a 13% uplift (2.5 GW<sub>dc</sub>) to the utility-scale outlook compared to last quarter.</p><h5>One year after passage of the IRA, the full benefits have yet to materialize</h5><p>The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) passed in August 2022 and has undoubtedly caused a wave of intense optimism for the future growth of the solar industry. In the last year, Wood Mackenzie and SEIA have tracked dozens of announcements for new solar manufacturing facilities across the supply chain stemming from the law’s manufacturing provisions and the anticipated increases in solar demand. If all of the announced plans for module manufacturing facilities materialize, the US (including Puerto Rico) would increase its total capacity by an order of magnitude by 2026 – from 10.6 GW to 108.5 GW.</p><p>But the IRA has yet to drive more solar projects through final stages of development, causing pipeline growth to stagnate. In the year leading up to the IRA’s passage, an average of 5.8 GWdc of utility-scale solar was procured each quarter. In the year since then, that average has fallen to 3.8 GWdc. In many major commercial solar markets where IRA incentives are expected to increase development of projects under 5 MWac – Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York – pipelines have either shrunk or remained flat recently.</p><p>This isn’t due to a lack of interest in solar project development. If anything, the amount of capital seeking high-quality solar project investments has only increased. Multiple factors are causing pipeline stagnation. They include high interest rates, elevated hardware and labor costs, and increased local opposition to clean energy projects. But the uncertainty around qualifying and claiming IRA benefits is exacerbating this, as well. Critical guidance from the Department of the Treasury has helped address some questions but has left others unanswered. The processes for qualifying for various tax credit adders have proven more complicated than the industry anticipated, particularly for the domestic content tax credit adder. Without full clarity on qualifications and processes, developers, manufacturers, and financiers are often left in limbo. As a result, the full benefits of the IRA, in the form of more development of solar projects that meet various policy objectives, won’t manifest until developers, asset owners, and financiers have enough regulatory clarity to make confident investments.</p><p>The residential solar industry is also waiting for more clarity on various IRA benefits. Wood Mackenzie expects that third-party ownership financing (leases and power purchase agreements) will increase over the long-term as third-party financiers take advantage of the tax credit adders. (Note that the tax credit adders are not available to customer-owned residential solar.) But until there’s more clarity, particularly related to qualifying for the domestic content adder and low-income communities (LMI) adder, residential solar companies are waiting to factor these tax credit benefits into their projected sales.</p><h5>Developers are adapting their supply chains as modules with non-Xinjiang Chinese polysilicon have yet to pass customs</h5><p>It’s clear from installation volumes and solar equipment imports through the first half of this year that developers are adapting their supply chains. This work began in late 2021 with the initiation of the Withhold Release Order (WRO) and continued with the anticircumvention investigation and the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA). Developers have procured alternative sources of solar equipment and have successfully demonstrated compliance with polysilicon sourcing requirements to US Customs and Border Protection (CBP).</p><p>All that being said, there is still no evidence that solar modules made with Chinese polysilicon are making their way through US ports. Demonstrating compliance with the UFLPA for Chinese polysilicon from outside Xinjiang (the region of China that the UFLPA targets) has proven challenging. For the time being, solar equipment that is making its way through ports utilizes polysilicon from North American or European sources. But these sources make up a small portion of global solar-grade polysilicon. It’s unclear when solar modules made with non-Xinjiang Chinese polysilicon – one of the industry’s largest sources of solar-grade polysilicon – will move through US ports.</p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%203.png" data-entity-uuid="6543cc02-4d7c-4952-9645-050a4b583f46" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 3" width="2210" height="909" loading="lazy" /></p><p>Developers have also been adapting their supply chains to manage the impacts of the anticircumvention investigation. In mid-August, the US Department of Commerce (DOC) released its final determination, confirming nearly all the provisions of its preliminary determination released last December. Beginning in June 2024, new tariffs will be applied to solar cell and module imports from Southeast Asia unless the importer can meet one of the exemptions. Manufacturers and developers will be safe-harboring modules prior to the deadline and working to source non-tariffed supply. However, all safe-harbored equipment must be installed within 180 days of the end of the moratorium, potentially leaving supply gaps in 2025. This puts added pressure on manufacturers working to build new facilities that could fill this industry need. The anticircumvention tariffs will impact where US importers source their modules. The UFLPA continues to be the most limiting factor for utility-scale solar buildout, but on balance, we expect there will be sufficient supply to serve the market by 2025. </p><p>The clear consequence of these events is more expensive solar equipment for the US market, at least in the near-term. In the last six months, China has brought an immense amount of solar equipment manufacturing online (across the value chain from polysilicon through modules) reducing module prices globally. Our tracking reveals that global average selling prices for modules have decreased by 1-3 cents/watt in the last six months, which can amount to a 10-12% price reduction. But layers of tariffs and other trade barriers have prevented such movement in US prices. Import prices through June continued to remain well above global averages. </p><h4><strong>We still expect the solar industry to nearly triple in the next five years</strong></h4><p>Our outlooks have changed minimally since last quarter. We increased our outlook for utility-scale in the near-term, but lowered our expectations slightly in the later years. After 2023, annual growth for utility-scale solar will average 9% as pipelines of contracted projects come online. Distributed solar markets will experience fluctuations in growth over the next five years as net billing is implemented in California, community solar markets work through interconnection challenges, and emerging markets pick up momentum. Residential solar will grow 6% on average over the next five years while non-residential solar will increase by 8%. </p><p>There is a cumulative total of 153 gigawatts direct current (GWdc) of solar capacity installed through the first half of 2023, and we expect this figure to grow to 375 GWdc by the end of 2028. Even with the current challenges facing this market, the solar industry is looking at many years of sustained, strong growth. </p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%204.png" data-entity-uuid="4aa42883-bd5c-4df9-a67f-ccf14c081341" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 4" width="2210" height="1340" loading="lazy" /></p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%205.png" data-entity-uuid="0b0eb6f8-7ff4-4da5-bb9d-4599dc4e0491" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 5" width="1959" height="3382" loading="lazy" /><br /> </p><h2>3.    Market segment outlooks</h2><h4>3.1.    Residential PV  </h4><ul><li>1,773 MW<sub>dc</sub> installed in Q2 2023</li><li>Up 30% from Q2 2022</li><li>Up 6% from Q1 2023 <br /> </li></ul><p>In Q2 2023, the residential solar market grew 30% year-over-year and set a national quarterly record. After a decline in newly installed capacity in the first quarter, the segment bounced back in Q2. While more than 10 states set quarterly records, growth has not been as strong in traditionally larger markets with lower retail rates like Arizona and Texas, where high interest rates are creating headwinds. However, installation backlogs created under California NEM 2.0, significant retail rate increases in many states, and reduced equipment pricing are offsetting some of these impacts.</p><p>Despite installation growth, the first half of 2023 has been unique and challenging for the residential segment. Some installers report that it has been the slowest ramp-up to the solar sales season since 2019. This demand softening continues to reflect customer expectations of a recession and a lower urgency to go solar due to the ITC extension, coupled with rising interest rates and inflation. Many installers are re-evaluating sales strategies and product offerings as these market dynamics challenge business-as-usual models.</p><p>Wood Mackenzie forecasts 9% growth for residential solar in 2023, up slightly from last quarter’s forecast, driven by growth in states with retail rate inflation. Immense sales made under California NEM 2.0 contributed to a quarterly record of 607 MW<sub>dc</sub> of statewide capacity and will continue to fuel a surge of installations in the short term. The eventual drop in California installations will lead this year’s volumes to be similar to 2022 and a 38% contraction for the state in 2024, leading to a 4% national market contraction. For all states except California, we expect 12% growth in 2024 as the industry benefits more from the IRA. Additionally, more third-party owned projects are expected to qualify for the ITC adders over the next few years. These factors drive our expectations for 8% average annual national growth between 2025-2028. </p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%206.png" data-entity-uuid="11d75950-b6b9-4af7-a646-e123ddc8a0be" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 6" width="2221" height="1254" loading="lazy" /><br /> </p><h2>3.2.    Commercial PV </h2><ul><li>345 MW<sub>dc</sub> installed in Q2 2023</li><li>Down 9% from Q2 2022</li><li>Down 20% from Q1 2023 </li></ul><p><em>Note on market segmentation: Commercial solar encompasses distributed solar projects with commercial, industrial, agricultural, school, government or nonprofit offtakers, including remotely net-metered projects. This excludes community solar (covered in the following section).</em></p><p>Commercial solar installations declined quarter-over-quarter, and we continue to see stagnation or declines in major market pipelines. That being said, many markets still have healthy project pipelines, driving our expectations for 11% growth in 2023. Although second quarter capacity decreased from the first quarter, the number of projects increased by 7%. Along with supply chain constraints easing up, increasing energy prices are sustaining activity in major state markets such as New Jersey and New York, and driving new development in other emerging states like Georgia and Ohio.</p><p>Developers across the nation are encountering a wide variety of difficulties. At the forefront are interconnection and queue congestion, caused by slow completion of studies and issues with receiving prompt approval for other interconnection-related applications. Prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements for projects larger than 1 MW<sub>ac</sub> as well as a lack of formal incentive programs in emerging markets like the Southeast are also challenging the industry. Developers are hesitating to include certain tax credit adders in their financial models until Treasury provides additional clarity, taking their risk appetite into consideration and ensuring capital returns without these adders. Overall, interconnection delays are impacting the segment most significantly.</p><p>Changes to our broad commercial solar outlook have been minimal this quarter. We still expect more than12 GW<sub>dc</sub> of installations and 8% average growth over the next five years. Near-term growth is boosted by California’s shift to net billing, creating demand pull-in through 2024. In the medium term, installations are expected to decrease as projects exempt from wage and apprenticeship requirements have mostly come online and California’s pipeline of NEM 2.0 projects has been installed. Long-term growth will gradually increase due to the IRA and higher electricity rates. We expect 1,731 MW<sub>dc</sub> to come online nationally this year and to grow to 2,500 MW<sub>dc</sub> by 2028. </p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%207.png" data-entity-uuid="0c9a654d-dda8-4deb-9145-7402b158050a" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 7" width="1995" height="1054" loading="lazy" /><br /> </p><h2>3.3.    Community solar PV</h2><ul><li>226 MW<sub>dc</sub> installed in Q2 2023</li><li>Down 16% from Q2 2022</li><li>Down 1% from Q1 2023 </li></ul><p><em>Note on market segmentation: Community solar projects are part of formal programs where multiple residential and non-residential customers can subscribe to the power produced by a local solar project and receive credits on their utility bills.</em></p><p>Community solar installations declined 16% year-over-year in Q2 2023, resulting in the lowest first half of the year for the segment since 2020. Massachusetts recorded its lowest quarter since 2019 with 10.3 MW<sub>dc</sub> of new community solar interconnected, and New Jersey did not record any new community solar installations. Installed capacity in New York increased 15% year-over-year, and the state made up 52% of total national capacity for the first half of the year. </p><p>After years of rapid expansion, the community solar segment shows clear signs of growing pains. On one hand, well-established markets have seen sharp declines in installed capacity driven by market saturation, persistent interconnection delays, and the slow process of program reform. On the other hand, several states issued beneficial policy announcements this year. These include the expansion of programs in New Jersey and Maryland, as well as significant program reform in Minnesota. As a result, while we expect national volumes to decline 6% year-over-year in 2023, momentum will pick up again in 2024. The segment will grow at an annual average rate of 11% from 2024-2028 as installed capacity catches up to an improved policy environment and revived developer interest.</p><p>Community solar developers are also navigating how they will take advantage of new IRA incentives. As in other segments, qualifying for any of the three available ITC adders will prove more difficult than originally expected due to complex requirements. Community solar developers will most likely target the low-income communities adder – applications for which will open this Fall. We are also closely monitoring the impact of the $27 billion Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund, particularly the EPA’s $7 billion Solar for All funding opportunity. Several states announced requests for funding throughout this quarter, but funding will not be awarded until 2024. Awards will support the establishment and expansion of community solar programs throughout the country with an emphasis on supporting low-income communities.</p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%208.png" data-entity-uuid="7f12b53e-06dc-4c80-882c-7fca7f856dc3" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 8" width="1995" height="1114" loading="lazy" /></p><h2>3.4.    Utility PV <br /> </h2><ul><li>3.3 GW<sub>dc</sub> installed in Q2 2023</li><li>170 GW<sub>dc</sub> of utility-scale solar will be added between 2023 and 2028</li></ul><p>Utility-scale solar rebounded this quarter with the strongest first quarter on record. The sector achieved 66% year-over-year growth and exceeded the previous record Q1 by more than 170 MW<sub>dc</sub>. Over 3 GW<sub>dc</sub> of new contracts were signed in Q1, maintaining the total utility-scale solar pipeline at 90 GW<sub>dc</sub>.  <br />A strong Q4 2022 and Q1 2023 indicates that developers are recovering from supply chain hurdles. Developers are receiving inventory, as more than 40% of all electronics shipments from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam have been released from UFLPA detention (though not all electronics shipments are modules). Although prices have stabilized, they remain high compared to Q1 2022. Additionally, President Biden’s veto of legislation that would have repealed the two-year pause on new solar tariffs ensures that there is time to source alternate supply if new duties come into effect in June 2024.</p><p>Though inventory levels are improving, the utility-scale industry still faces supply chain constraints. Despite increasing shipment releases indicating a more stabilized UFLPA situation, there is no indication that products containing Chinese non-Xinjiang polysilicon are entering the US. Additionally, other factors such as growing NIMBYism, high interconnection times and costs, and low labor availability will continue to challenge the utility-scale solar industry.</p><p>Despite these headwinds, Wood Mackenzie forecasts that total new utility-scale installations will reach 172 GWdc between 2023-2028. A strong first quarter resulted in a slight uplift to our 2023 outlook to more than 20 GW<sub>dc</sub>. While the market will start to feel the impacts of the IRA in 2024 and 2025, we decreased the latter years of the forecast by 4% due to changing assumptions on interconnection queue delays and the cost competitiveness of solar against other technologies.</p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%209.png" data-entity-uuid="2010c7bb-392d-49e0-98f6-0e463e411651" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 9" width="2210" height="1161" loading="lazy" /></p><h2>4.    US solar PV forecasts</h2><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%2010.png" data-entity-uuid="901e70a2-b801-4ec1-bf94-fbc42d1b550b" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 10" width="2210" height="1380" loading="lazy" /></p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%2011.png" data-entity-uuid="f0f441ce-7284-4213-a695-1beca51cbdf7" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 11" width="1906" height="1123" loading="lazy" /></p><h2>5.    National solar PV system pricing</h2><p><em>Note: Wood Mackenzie has updated the reporting methodology for modeled prices to be consistent with US solar system pricing reports. Therefore, figures shown below may not match those published in earlier editions of the US Solar Market Insight report.</em></p><p>Wood Mackenzie employs a bottom-up modeling methodology to capture, track and report national average PV system pricing by segment for systems installed each quarter. The methodology is based on the tracked wholesale pricing of major solar components and data collected from industry interviews. Wood Mackenzie’s Supply Chain data and models are leveraged to enhance and bolster our pricing outlooks. Wood Mackenzie assumes all product is procured and delivered in the same year as the installation except modules for the utility segment, which are procured one year prior to commercial operation. </p><p><img src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/SMI%20Exec%20Charts%20Q3%202023_Figure%2012.png" data-entity-uuid="9dfcc826-4dfb-4447-a97b-a553f5d03e7d" data-entity-type="file" alt="Figure 12" width="1905" height="1549" loading="lazy" /><br /><br />National PV system prices were higher in Q2 2023 compared to Q2 2022. Despite easing supply chain constraints and logistical issues, costs have remained high in 2023 as labor and balance of system costs have increased. Components such as modules and inverters are up 5% to 20% year-over-year for the commercial and utility segments, and labor costs are up by 5% in 2023 due to rising inflation. Last year’s supply chain constraints are having a delayed impact on 2023 utility-scale module pricing due to the one-year lag in module procurement for the utility segment.</p><p>The average residential PV system price is up 2% compared to Q2 2022 and the commercial PV system price is up 1% during the same time. The average utility-scale fixed-tilt and single-axis tracker system prices are up 5% and 3%, respectively, in Q2 2023 compared to Q2 2022.</p><h4>About the Report</h4><p><strong>U.S. solar market insight<sup>®</sup></strong> is a quarterly publication of Wood Mackenzie and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)®. Each quarter, we collect granular data on the U.S. solar market from nearly 200 utilities, state agencies, installers and manufacturers. This data provides the backbone of this U.S. Solar Market Insight® report, in which we identify and analyze trends in U.S. solar demand, manufacturing and pricing by state and market segment over the next five to ten years. All forecasts are from Wood Mackenzie, Limited; SEIA does not predict future pricing, bid terms, costs, deployment or supply. The report includes all 50 states and Washington, D.C. National totals reported also include Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories. Detailed data and forecasts for 50 states and Washington, D.C. are contained within the full version of the report.</p><h5>References and Contact</h5><ul><li>References, data, charts and analysis from this executive summary should be attributed to “Wood Mackenzie/SEIA U.S. solar market insight<sup>®</sup>.”</li><li>Media inquiries should be directed to Wood Mackenzie’s PR team (<a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>) and Morgan Lyons (<a href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>) at SEIA.</li><li>All figures are sourced from Wood Mackenzie. For more detail on methodology and sources, <a href="https://www.woodmac.com/research/products/power-and-renewables/us-solar-market-insight/">click here</a>.</li></ul><h4>About the Authors</h4><h5>Wood Mackenzie Power &amp; Renewables | U.S. Research Team</h5><p><strong>Michelle Davis, </strong>Director, Head of Global Solar (lead author) <br /><strong>Sylvia Leyba Martinez, </strong>Principal Analyst <br /><strong>Zoe Gaston, </strong>Principal Analyst <br /><strong>Sagar Chopra, </strong>Senior Analyst <br /><strong>Caitlin Connelly, </strong>Research Analyst <br /><strong>Matt Issokson, </strong>Research Analyst <br /><strong>Elissa Pierce, </strong>Research Associate <br /><strong>Amanda Colombo, </strong>Research Associate</p><h5>Solar Energy Industries Association | SEIA</h5><p><strong>Shawn Rumery</strong>, Senior Director of Research <br /><strong>Colin Silver</strong>, Senior Vice President of Content &amp; Strategy<br /><strong>Tyler Thompson</strong>, Research Analyst <br /><strong>Justin Baca</strong>, Vice President of Markets &amp; Research</p><p><strong>Note on U.S. solar market insight report title: </strong><em>The report title is based on the quarter in which the report is released, not the most recent quarter of installation figures</em>.</p><h4>License</h4><h5> </h5><h5>Ownership rights</h5><p>This report ("Report") and all <em>Solar Market Insight<sup>®</sup></em> ("SMI")TM reports are jointly owned by <strong>Wood Mackenzie and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)<sup>®</sup></strong>(jointly, "Owners") and are protected by United States copyright and trademark laws and international copyright/intellectual property laws under applicable treaties and/or conventions. Purchaser of Report or other person obtaining a copy legally ("User") agrees not to export Report into a country that does not have copyright/intellectual property laws that will protect rights of Owners therein.</p><h5>Grant of license rights</h5><p>Owners hereby grant user a non-exclusive, non-refundable, non-transferable Enterprise License, which allows you to (i) distribute the report within your organization across multiple locations to its representatives, employees or agents who are authorized by the organization to view the report in support of the organization’s internal business purposes, and (ii) display the report within your organization’s privately hosted internal intranet in support of your organization’s internal business purposes. Your right to distribute the report under an Enterprise License allows distribution among multiple locations or facilities to Authorized Users within your organization.</p><p>Owners retain exclusive and sole ownership of this report. User agrees not to permit any unauthorized use, reproduction, distribution, publication or electronic transmission of any report or the information/forecasts therein without the express written permission of Owners.</p><h5>Disclaimer of warranty and liability</h5><p>Owners have used their best efforts in collecting and preparing each report.</p><p>Owners, their employees, affiliates, agents, and licensors do not warrant the accuracy, completeness, correctness, non-infringement, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose of any reports covered by this agreement. Owners, their employees, affiliates, agents, or licensors shall not be liable to user or any third party for losses or injury caused in whole or part by our negligence or contingencies beyond Owners’ control in compiling, preparing or disseminating any report or for any decision made or action taken by user or any third party in reliance on such information or for any consequential, special, indirect or similar damages, even if Owners were advised of the possibility of the same. User agrees that the liability of Owners, their employees, affiliates, agents and licensors, if any, arising out of any kind of legal claim (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) in connection with its goods/services under this agreement shall not exceed the amount you paid to Owners for use of the report in question.</p><p> </p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Browse Resources by Related Topics:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/federal-state-regulatory-policy" hreflang="en">Federal, State &amp; Regulatory Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/regulatory-policy" hreflang="en">Regulatory Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/state-solar-policy" hreflang="en">State Solar Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/tax-policy" hreflang="en">Tax Policy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-investment-tax-credit" hreflang="en">Solar Investment Tax Credit</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/finance-programs" hreflang="en">Finance Programs</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/finance-tax" hreflang="en">Finance &amp; Tax</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-equity" hreflang="en">Climate &amp; Equity</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/diversity-equity-inclusion" hreflang="en">Diversity, Equity &amp; Inclusion</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/low-income-solar" hreflang="en">Low-Income Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/environmental-justice" hreflang="en">Environmental Justice</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/environment" hreflang="en">Environment</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/managing-growth" hreflang="en">Managing Growth</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/workforce-development" hreflang="en">Workforce Development</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/land-use-solar-development" hreflang="en">Land Use &amp; Solar Development</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/circular-economy" hreflang="en">Circular Economy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/consumer-protection" hreflang="en">Consumer Protection</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/health-safety" hreflang="en">Health &amp; Safety</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/trade-technology-manufacturing" hreflang="en">Trade, Technology &amp; Manufacturing</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/domestic-manufacturing" hreflang="en">Domestic Manufacturing</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/international-trade" hreflang="en">International Trade</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/about-solar-energy" hreflang="en">About Solar Energy</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-technologies" hreflang="en">Solar Technologies</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/cybersecurity" hreflang="en">Cybersecurity</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field_link" > <div id="item-1" class="field-item field-item-1 scroll-target" ><a href="https://www.woodmac.com/research/products/power-and-renewables/us-solar-market-insight/#gs.BLbjX=w">Purchase the Full Report</a></div> <div id="item-2" class="field-item field-item-2 scroll-target" ><a href="http://www2.seia.org/l/139231/2023-09-06/2q4qv2">Download a PDF of this Report</a></div> <div id="item-3" class="field-item field-item-3 scroll-target" ><a href="https://www.seia.org/news/solar-installations-2023-expected-exceed-30-gw-first-time-history">Read the Press Release</a></div> </div> <div class="field field_resource_type" > <div class="field-label" >Resource Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/resource-types/report" hreflang="en">Report</a></div> </div> Thu, 07 Sep 2023 04:00:51 +0000 [email protected] 14664442 at http://www.seia.org In the Face of Climate Disaster, Solar and Storage Deliver Resilient, Adaptable Solutions http://www.seia.org/blog/face-climate-disaster-solar-and-storage-deliver-resilient-adaptable-solutions <span>In the Face of Climate Disaster, Solar and Storage Deliver Resilient, Adaptable Solutions </span> <span><span>techols</span></span> <span>Wed, 08/02/2023 - 08:20</span> <div class="field field_blogger" > <div class="field-label" >By</div> <div class="field-item" >SEIA Comms Team</div> </div> <div class="field field_image" > <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/2023-08/maxresdefault.jpg" width="1280" height="720" alt="Casa Pueblo in Puerto Rico." /> </div> <div class="field body" ><p><em>Casa Pueblo in Puerto Rico. Photo courtesy of Isabela Zawistowska/Honnold Foundation. </em><a href="https://www.honnoldfoundation.org/partner/casa-pueblo"><em>The Honnold Foundation worked with Casa Pueblo</em></a><em> to design and build Puerto Rico’s first cooperatively managed, community-owned solar microgrid.</em></p><p>In the face of increasingly extreme weather, improving the climate resilience of our energy infrastructure has never been more urgent. Dangerous heatwaves, devastating hurricanes and unpredictable weather patterns are threatening millions of Americans and putting unprecedented stress on America’s electrical grid.  </p><p>Time and time again, solar energy has demonstrated its value through reliability in the face of extreme weather, providing safety and stability when communities need it most.  </p><p>Solar and storage solutions are empowering communities with the tools they need to build resilience, helping consumers harness electricity in ways that best fit their needs and fortify America’s energy infrastructure from the impacts of climate change.  </p><p>Here’s how some states are leading the way on solar resilience.  </p><p><strong>Texas’ Solar-Supported Grid</strong></p><p>This summer, Texas has endured a lengthy, dangerous heatwave. As the state broke temperature records and Texans cranked up their air conditioning, energy demand rose dramatically, and experts worried that the state’s electrical grid may not be able to keep up.  </p><p>However, thanks to the wave of new solar and battery storage being added to Texas’ grid, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2023/07/28/business/texas-renewable-energy-heat-wave-climate/index.html">power has stayed on, and prices haven’t spiked</a>.  </p><p>Over the past two years, Texas has doubled its solar capacity by adding 9.7 gigawatts of solar, the most of any state in the country. Texas has also installed over 1.8 GWac of utility-scale storage projects, helping to increase the dispatchability of clean energy any time of day.</p><p>Even as temperatures have soared into the triple digits and thermal energy sources experienced outrages, renewables are stepping up to provide <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2023/07/28/business/texas-renewable-energy-heat-wave-climate/index.html">30 to 40% of the state’s power needs in peak hours</a>.  </p><p>These heatwaves aren’t slowing down, and solar and storage systems are one of the best tools we have for improving the reliability and predictability of America’s grid.</p><p><strong>Florida’s Template for Solar Resilience</strong></p><p>In the Southeast, hurricanes are one of the most dangerous forms of extreme weather, and hotter temperatures in gulf waters are supercharging these deadly storms.  </p><p>When a hurricane hits, electricity infrastructure and utility lines can be severely damaged, leaving families vulnerable for extended periods of time. Last year, Hurricane Ian ripped through southwest Florida and left 2.6 million customers without power.  </p><p>During Hurricane Ian, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2022/10/02/us/solar-babcock-ranch-florida-hurricane-ian-climate/index.html">Babcock Ranch, a 100% solar-powered community outside of Fort Myers, did not lose power</a>. The community’s 700,000-panel array and battery backup kept power flowing to all 2,000 homes even as the storm raged outside.  </p><p>With the help of solar and storage, Babcock Ranch was able to bounce back immediately and has become a model example for building resilient solar systems. Babcock Ranch now holds an <a href="https://www.actionnewsjax.com/news/local/innovation-southwest-florida-community-could-help-make-jacksonville-homes-safer-storm/HUM2PGNOP5AFVJC3EPML7NOJ2U/">annual summit for builders and developers</a> who want to understand how to build stronger, more sustainable communities.  </p><p><strong>Puerto Rico’s Innovative Microgrids</strong></p><p>In 2017, Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and homes, businesses, and much of the island’s energy infrastructure were destroyed.  </p><p>The power outages were deadly, and some communities were left without power for nearly a year. Advocates and nonprofits are now pushing to develop community-led, climate-resilient solutions throughout Puerto Rico.  </p><p>Earlier this year, Casa Pueblo, a community organization in the mountain town of Adjuntas, <a href="https://time.com/6264631/puerto-rico-adjuntas-solar-microgrid/">launched a new community-owned solar microgrid</a>. The organization already <a href="https://www.canarymedia.com/articles/solar/why-puerto-rican-communities-are-all-in-on-solar-microgrids">provides power to more than 350 homes and businesses</a>, and the new microgrid will power 14 additional businesses and keep the community running for 10 days on back-up power if the grid fails again.  </p><p>Local advocates see the microgrid in Adjuntas as a model for the rest of Puerto Rico. The project allows communities to control their energy decisions and collectively own the infrastructure they rely on, helping to strengthen community resilience and fortify Puerto Rico’s electricity system.  </p><p>The examples in Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico show that solar, storage, and microgrids are a vital part of any climate resilience plan. Solar and storage deliver greater reliability for the electric grid, safeguard families from the worst impacts of extreme weather, and help communities build a more resilient future.  </p><p>As climate change continues to intensify, it’s clear that solar and storage are ready to step up to the plate and play a leading role in any climate resilience plan.  </p></div> <div class="field field_topics" > <div class="field-label" >Topics</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/distributed-solar" hreflang="en">Rooftop Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-equity" hreflang="en">Climate &amp; Equity</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/topics/solar-storage" hreflang="en">Solar + Storage</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <h3 class="field__label inline">Tags</h3> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/tags/residential-solar" hreflang="en">Residential Solar</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/community-solar" hreflang="en">Community Solar</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/utility-scale-solar" hreflang="en">Utility-Scale Solar</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/climate" hreflang="en">Climate</a></li> <li><a href="/tags/storage" hreflang="en">Storage</a></li> </ul> </div> <div class="field field_article_type" > <div class="field-label" >Article Type</div> <div class="field-item" ><a href="/article-type/blog-post" hreflang="en">Blog Post</a></div> </div> Wed, 02 Aug 2023 12:20:12 +0000 techols 14663655 at http://www.seia.org